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void foo_null(void *unused)
{
foo_doo();
}
SYSINIT(foo, SI_SUB_FOO, SI_ORDER_FOO, foo_null, NULL);
struct foo foo_voodoo = {
FOO_VOODOO;
}
void foo_arg(void *vdata)
{
struct foo *foo = (struct foo *)vdata;
foo_data(foo);
}
SYSINIT(bar, SI_SUB_FOO, SI_ORDER_FOO, foo_arg, &foo_voodoo);
Note that `SI_SUB_FOO` and `SI_ORDER_FOO` need to be in the `sysinit_sub_id` and `sysinit_elem_order` enum's as mentioned above. Either use existing ones or add your own to the enum's. You can also use math for fine-tuning the order a SYSINIT will run in. This example shows a SYSINIT that needs to be run just barely before the SYSINIT's that handle tuning kernel parameters.
Example of Adjusting `SYSINIT()` Order
static void
mptable_register(void *dummy __unused)
{
apic_register_enumerator(&mptable_enumerator);
}
SYSINIT(mptable_register, SI_SUB_TUNABLES - 1, SI_ORDER_FIRST,
mptable_register, NULL);
Shutdown
The `SYSUNINIT()` macro behaves similarly to the `SYSINIT()` macro except that it adds the SYSINIT data to SYSINIT's shutdown data set.
Example of a `SYSUNINIT()`
void foo_cleanup(void *unused)
{
foo_kill();
}
SYSUNINIT(foobar, SI_SUB_FOO, SI_ORDER_FOO, foo_cleanup, NULL);
struct foo_stack foo_stack = {
FOO_STACK_VOODOO;
}
void foo_flush(void *vdata)
{
}
SYSUNINIT(barfoo, SI_SUB_FOO, SI_ORDER_FOO, foo_flush, &foo_stack);