Source string Read only

(itstool) path: legalnotice/para
60/600
Context English State
_ translator-credits
Why you should use a BSD style license for your Open Source Project
<email>brucem@alumni.cse.ucsc.edu</email>
<personname><firstname>Bruce</firstname><surname>Montague</surname></personname><affiliation> <_:address-1/> </affiliation>
FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Intel, Celeron, Centrino, Core, EtherExpress, i386, i486, Itanium, Pentium, and Xeon are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries.
Many of the designations used by manufacturers and sellers to distinguish their products are claimed as trademarks. Where those designations appear in this document, and the FreeBSD Project was aware of the trademark claim, the designations have been followed by the <quote>™</quote> or the <quote>®</quote> symbol.
$FreeBSD: head/en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/bsdl-gpl/article.xml 53942 2020-03-01 12:23:40Z carlavilla $
Introduction
This document makes a case for using a BSD style license for software and data; specifically it recommends using a BSD style license in place of the GPL. It can also be read as a BSD versus GPL Open Source License introduction and summary.
Very Brief Open Source History
Long before the term <quote>Open Source</quote> was used, software was developed by loose associations of programmers and freely exchanged. Starting in the early 1950's, organizations such as <link xlink:href="http://www.share.org">SHARE</link> and <link xlink:href="http://www.decus.org">DECUS</link> developed much of the software that computer hardware companies bundled with their hardware offerings. At that time computer companies were in the hardware business; anything that reduced software cost and made more programs available made the hardware companies more competitive.
This model changed in the 1960's. In 1965 ADR developed the first licensed software product independent of a hardware company. ADR was competing against a free IBM package originally developed by IBM customers. ADR patented their software in 1968. To stop sharing of their program, they provided it under an equipment lease in which payment was spread over the lifetime of the product. ADR thus retained ownership and could control resale and reuse.
In 1969 the US Department of Justice charged IBM with destroying businesses by bundling free software with IBM hardware. As a result of this suit, IBM unbundled its software; that is, software became independent products separate from hardware.
In 1968 Informatics introduced the first commercial killer-app and rapidly established the concept of the software product, the software company, and very high rates of return. Informatics developed the perpetual license which is now standard throughout the computer industry, wherein ownership is never transferred to the customer.
Unix from a BSD Licensing Perspective
AT&amp;T, who owned the original Unix implementation, was a publicly regulated monopoly tied up in anti-trust court; it was legally unable to sell a product into the software market. It was, however, able to provide it to academic institutions for the price of media.
Universities rapidly adopted Unix after an OS conference publicized its availability. It was extremely helpful that Unix ran on the PDP-11, a very affordable 16-bit computer, and was coded in a high-level language that was demonstrably good for systems programming. The DEC PDP-11 had, in effect, an open hardware interface designed to make it easy for customers to write their own OS, which was common. As DEC founder Ken Olsen famously proclaimed, <quote>software comes from heaven when you have good hardware</quote>.
Unix author Ken Thompson returned to his alma mater, University of California Berkeley (UCB), in 1975 and taught the kernel line-by-line. This ultimately resulted in an evolving system known as BSD (Berkeley Standard Distribution). UCB converted Unix to 32-bits, added virtual memory, and implemented the version of the TCP/IP stack upon which the Internet was essentially built. UCB made BSD available for the cost of media, under what became known as <quote>the BSD license</quote>. A customer purchased Unix from AT&amp;T and then ordered a BSD tape from UCB.
In the mid-1980s a government anti-trust case against AT&amp;T ended with the break-up of AT&amp;T. AT&amp;T still owned Unix and was now able to sell it. AT&amp;T embarked on an aggressive licensing effort and most commercial Unixes of the day became AT&amp;T-derived.
ComponentTranslation
This translation Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_bsdl-gpl FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
The following strings have the same context and source.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_linux-emulation FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_ipsec-must FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_new-users FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_ldap-auth FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_solid-state FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_contributors FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_linux-users FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_freebsd-releng FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_gjournal-desktop FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_rc-scripting FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_cups FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_explaining-bsd FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_fonts FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_freebsd-questions FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_freebsd-update-server FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_geom-class FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_hubs FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_filtering-bridge FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_nanobsd FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_problem-reports FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_releng FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_serial-uart FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_vm-design FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/books_arch-handbook FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_pam FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/books_faq FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/books_porters-handbook FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_pr-guidelines FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_remote-install FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/books_developers-handbook FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_building-products FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_contributing FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/books_handbook FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Translated FreeBSD Doc/articles_committers-guide FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.

Loading…

No matching activity found.

Browse all component changes

Things to check

Multiple failing checks

The translations in several languages have failing checks

Reset

Glossary

English English
No related strings found in the glossary.

Source information

Source string comment
(itstool) path: legalnotice/para
Flags
read-only
Source string location
article.translate.xml:15
String age
a year ago
Source string age
a year ago
Translation file
articles/bsdl-gpl.pot, string 5