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FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.
Apple, AirPort, FireWire, iMac, iPhone, iPad, Mac, Macintosh, Mac OS, Quicktime, and TrueType are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.
IBM, AIX, OS/2, PowerPC, PS/2, S/390, and ThinkPad are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both.
IEEE, POSIX, and 802 are registered trademarks of Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. in the United States.
Intel, Celeron, Centrino, Core, EtherExpress, i386, i486, Itanium, Pentium, and Xeon are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries.
Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.
Microsoft, IntelliMouse, MS-DOS, Outlook, Windows, Windows Media and Windows NT are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.
Motif, OSF/1, and UNIX are registered trademarks and IT DialTone and The Open Group are trademarks of The Open Group in the United States and other countries.
Sun, Sun Microsystems, Java, Java Virtual Machine, JDK, JRE, JSP, JVM, Netra, OpenJDK, Solaris, StarOffice, SunOS and VirtualBox are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the United States and other countries.
Many of the designations used by manufacturers and sellers to distinguish their products are claimed as trademarks. Where those designations appear in this document, and the FreeBSD Project was aware of the trademark claim, the designations have been followed by the <quote>™</quote> or the <quote>®</quote> symbol.
Welcome to the Developers' Handbook. This manual is a <emphasis>work in progress</emphasis> and is the work of many individuals. Many sections do not yet exist and some of those that do exist need to be updated. If you are interested in helping with this project, send email to the <link xlink:href="http://lists.FreeBSD.org/mailman/listinfo/freebsd-doc">FreeBSD documentation project mailing list</link>.
The latest version of this document is always available from the <link xlink:href="@@URL_RELPREFIX@@/index.html">FreeBSD World Wide Web server</link>. It may also be downloaded in a variety of formats and compression options from the <link xlink:href="https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/doc/">FreeBSD FTP server</link> or one of the numerous <link xlink:href="@@URL_RELPREFIX@@/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/mirrors-ftp.html">mirror sites</link>.
Basics
Introduction
<personname><firstname>Murray</firstname><surname>Stokely</surname></personname><contrib>Contributed by </contrib>
<personname><firstname>Jeroen</firstname><surname>Ruigrok van der Werven</surname></personname>
Developing on FreeBSD
So here we are. System all installed and you are ready to start programming. But where to start? What does FreeBSD provide? What can it do for me, as a programmer?
These are some questions which this chapter tries to answer. Of course, programming has different levels of proficiency like any other trade. For some it is a hobby, for others it is their profession. The information in this chapter might be aimed toward the beginning programmer; indeed, it could serve useful for the programmer unfamiliar with the FreeBSD platform.
The BSD Vision
To produce the best <trademark class="registered">UNIX</trademark> like operating system package possible, with due respect to the original software tools ideology as well as usability, performance and stability.
Architectural Guidelines
Our ideology can be described by the following guidelines
Do not add new functionality unless an implementor cannot complete a real application without it.
It is as important to decide what a system is not as to decide what it is. Do not serve all the world's needs; rather, make the system extensible so that additional needs can be met in an upwardly compatible fashion.
The only thing worse than generalizing from one example is generalizing from no examples at all.
If a problem is not completely understood, it is probably best to provide no solution at all.
If you can get 90 percent of the desired effect for 10 percent of the work, use the simpler solution.
Isolate complexity as much as possible.
Provide mechanism, rather than policy. In particular, place user interface policy in the client's hands.
From Scheifler &amp; Gettys: "X Window System"

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(itstool) path: authorgroup/author
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read-only
Source string location
book.translate.xml:179
String age
a year ago
Source string age
a year ago
Translation file
books/developers-handbook.pot, string 26