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Context English State
<filename>dvd1.iso</filename>
Similar to <filename>disc1.iso</filename> but with additional packages.
<filename>memstick.img</filename>
A bootable image sufficient for writing to a USB stick.
<filename>bootonly.iso</filename>
A minimal image that requires network access during installation to completely install FreeBSD.
Full instructions on this procedure and a little bit more about installation issues in general can be found in the <link xlink:href="@@URL_RELPREFIX@@/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/bsdinstall.html">Handbook entry on installing FreeBSD</link>.
What do I do if the install image does not boot?
This can be caused by not downloading the image in <emphasis>binary</emphasis> mode when using <acronym>FTP</acronym>.
Some FTP clients default their transfer mode to <emphasis>ascii</emphasis> and attempt to change any end-of-line characters received to match the conventions used by the client's system. This will almost invariably corrupt the boot image. Check the SHA-256 checksum of the downloaded boot image: if it is not <emphasis>exactly</emphasis> that on the server, then the download process is suspect.
When using a command line FTP client, type <emphasis>binary</emphasis> at the FTP command prompt after getting connected to the server and before starting the download of the image.
Where are the instructions for installing FreeBSD?
Installation instructions can be found at <link xlink:href="@@URL_RELPREFIX@@/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/bsdinstall.html">Handbook entry on installing FreeBSD</link>.
How can I make my own custom release or install disk?
Customized FreeBSD installation media can be created by building a custom release. Follow the instructions in the <link xlink:href="@@URL_RELPREFIX@@/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/releng/article.html">Release Engineering</link> article.
Can <trademark class="registered">Windows</trademark> co-exist with FreeBSD? (x86-specific)
If <trademark class="registered">Windows</trademark> is installed first, then yes. FreeBSD's boot manager will then manage to boot <trademark class="registered">Windows</trademark> and FreeBSD. If <trademark class="registered">Windows</trademark> is installed afterwards, it will overwrite the boot manager. If that happens, see the next section.
Another operating system destroyed my Boot Manager. How do I get it back? (x86-specific)
This depends upon the boot manager. The FreeBSD boot selection menu can be reinstalled using <citerefentry><refentrytitle>boot0cfg</refentrytitle><manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>. For example, to restore the boot menu onto the disk <replaceable>ada0</replaceable>:
<prompt>#</prompt> <userinput>boot0cfg -B ada0</userinput>
The non-interactive MBR bootloader can be installed using <citerefentry><refentrytitle>gpart</refentrytitle><manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>:
<prompt>#</prompt> <userinput>gpart bootcode -b /boot/mbr ada0</userinput>
For more complex situations, including GPT disks, see <citerefentry><refentrytitle>gpart</refentrytitle><manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>.
Do I need to install the source?
In general, no. There is nothing in the base system which requires the presence of the source to operate. Some ports, like <package>sysutils/lsof</package>, will not build unless the source is installed. In particular, if the port builds a kernel module or directly operates on kernel structures, the source must be installed.
Do I need to build a kernel?
Usually not. The supplied <literal>GENERIC</literal> kernel contains the drivers an ordinary computer will need. <citerefentry><refentrytitle>freebsd-update</refentrytitle><manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>, the FreeBSD binary upgrade tool, cannot upgrade custom kernels, another reason to stick with the <literal>GENERIC</literal> kernel when possible. For computers with very limited RAM, such as embedded systems, it may be worthwhile to build a smaller custom kernel containing just the required drivers.
Should I use DES, Blowfish, or MD5 passwords and how do I specify which form my users receive?
FreeBSD uses <emphasis>SHA512</emphasis> by default. DES passwords are still available for backwards compatibility with operating systems that still use the less secure password format. FreeBSD also supports the Blowfish and MD5 password formats. Which password format to use for new passwords is controlled by the <literal>passwd_format</literal> login capability in <filename>/etc/login.conf</filename>, which takes values of <literal>des</literal>, <literal>blf</literal> (if these are available) or <literal>md5</literal>. See the <citerefentry><refentrytitle>login.conf</refentrytitle><manvolnum>5</manvolnum></citerefentry> manual page for more information about login capabilities.
What are the limits for FFS file systems?
For FFS file systems, the largest file system is practically limited by the amount of memory required to <citerefentry><refentrytitle>fsck</refentrytitle><manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry> the file system. <citerefentry><refentrytitle>fsck</refentrytitle><manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry> requires one bit per fragment, which with the default fragment size of 4 KB equates to 32 MB of memory per TB of disk. This does mean that on architectures which limit userland processes to 2 GB (e.g., <trademark>i386</trademark>), the maximum <citerefentry><refentrytitle>fsck</refentrytitle><manvolnum>8</manvolnum></citerefentry>'able filesystem is ~60 TB.

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Source string comment
(itstool) path: question/para
Flags
read-only
Source string location
book.translate.xml:1215
String age
a year ago
Source string age
a year ago
Translation file
books/faq.pot, string 208