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<primary>Walnut Creek CDROM</primary>
The trio thought that the goal remained worthwhile, even without Bill's support, and so they adopted the name "FreeBSD" coined by David Greenman. The initial objectives were set after consulting with the system's current users and, once it became clear that the project was on the road to perhaps even becoming a reality, Jordan contacted Walnut Creek CDROM with an eye toward improving FreeBSD's distribution channels for those many unfortunates without easy access to the Internet. Walnut Creek CDROM not only supported the idea of distributing FreeBSD on CD but also went so far as to provide the project with a machine to work on and a fast Internet connection. Without Walnut Creek CDROM's almost unprecedented degree of faith in what was, at the time, a completely unknown project, it is quite unlikely that FreeBSD would have gotten as far, as fast, as it has today.
<primary>4.3BSD-Lite</primary>
<primary>Net/2</primary>
<primary>U.C. Berkeley</primary>
<primary>Free Software Foundation</primary>
The first CD-ROM (and general net-wide) distribution was FreeBSD 1.0, released in December of 1993. This was based on the 4.3BSD-Lite (<quote>Net/2</quote>) tape from U.C. Berkeley, with many components also provided by 386BSD and the Free Software Foundation. It was a fairly reasonable success for a first offering, and they followed it with the highly successful FreeBSD 1.1 release in May of 1994.
<primary>Novell</primary>
<primary>AT&amp;T</primary>
Around this time, some rather unexpected storm clouds formed on the horizon as Novell and U.C. Berkeley settled their long-running lawsuit over the legal status of the Berkeley Net/2 tape. A condition of that settlement was U.C. Berkeley's concession that large parts of Net/2 were <quote>encumbered</quote> code and the property of Novell, who had in turn acquired it from AT&amp;T some time previously. What Berkeley got in return was Novell's <quote>blessing</quote> that the 4.4BSD-Lite release, when it was finally released, would be declared unencumbered and all existing Net/2 users would be strongly encouraged to switch. This included FreeBSD, and the project was given until the end of July 1994 to stop shipping its own Net/2 based product. Under the terms of that agreement, the project was allowed one last release before the deadline, that release being FreeBSD 1.1.5.1.
FreeBSD then set about the arduous task of literally re-inventing itself from a completely new and rather incomplete set of 4.4BSD-Lite bits. The <quote>Lite</quote> releases were light in part because Berkeley's CSRG had removed large chunks of code required for actually constructing a bootable running system (due to various legal requirements) and the fact that the Intel port of 4.4 was highly incomplete. It took the project until November of 1994 to make this transition, and in December it released FreeBSD 2.0 to the world. Despite being still more than a little rough around the edges, the release was a significant success and was followed by the more robust and easier to install FreeBSD 2.0.5 release in June of 1995.
Since that time, FreeBSD has made a series of releases each time improving the stability, speed, and feature set of the previous version.
For now, long-term development projects continue to take place in the 10.X-CURRENT (trunk) branch, and snapshot releases of 10.X are continually made available from <link xlink:href="ftp://ftp.FreeBSD.org/pub/FreeBSD/snapshots/">the snapshot server</link> as work progresses.
FreeBSD Project Goals
<personname> <firstname>Jordan</firstname> <surname>Hubbard</surname> </personname> <contrib>Contributed by </contrib>
<primary>FreeBSD Project</primary> <secondary>goals</secondary>
The goals of the FreeBSD Project are to provide software that may be used for any purpose and without strings attached. Many of us have a significant investment in the code (and project) and would certainly not mind a little financial compensation now and then, but we are definitely not prepared to insist on it. We believe that our first and foremost <quote>mission</quote> is to provide code to any and all comers, and for whatever purpose, so that the code gets the widest possible use and provides the widest possible benefit. This is, I believe, one of the most fundamental goals of Free Software and one that we enthusiastically support.
<primary>GNU General Public License (GPL)</primary>
<primary>GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL)</primary>
<primary>BSD Copyright</primary>
That code in our source tree which falls under the GNU General Public License (GPL) or Library General Public License (LGPL) comes with slightly more strings attached, though at least on the side of enforced access rather than the usual opposite. Due to the additional complexities that can evolve in the commercial use of GPL software we do, however, prefer software submitted under the more relaxed BSD license when it is a reasonable option to do so.
The FreeBSD Development Model
<personname> <firstname>Satoshi</firstname> <surname>Asami</surname> </personname> <contrib>Contributed by </contrib>
<primary>FreeBSD Project</primary> <secondary>development model</secondary>
The development of FreeBSD is a very open and flexible process, being literally built from the contributions of thousands of people around the world, as can be seen from our <link xlink:href="@@URL_RELPREFIX@@/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/contributors/article.html">list of contributors</link>. FreeBSD's development infrastructure allow these thousands of contributors to collaborate over the Internet. We are constantly on the lookout for new developers and ideas, and those interested in becoming more closely involved with the project need simply contact us at the <link xlink:href="http://lists.FreeBSD.org/mailman/listinfo/freebsd-hackers">FreeBSD technical discussions mailing list</link>. The <link xlink:href="http://lists.FreeBSD.org/mailman/listinfo/freebsd-announce">FreeBSD announcements mailing list</link> is also available to those wishing to make other FreeBSD users aware of major areas of work.
Useful things to know about the FreeBSD Project and its development process, whether working independently or in close cooperation:
The SVN repositories<anchor xml:id="development-cvs-repository"/>
<primary>CVS</primary>
<primary>CVS Repository</primary>
<primary>Concurrent Versions System</primary> <see>CVS</see>
<primary>Subversion</primary>

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Source string comment
(itstool) path: sect2/indexterm
Flags
read-only
Source string location
book.translate.xml:2516
String age
a year ago
Source string age
a year ago
Translation file
books/handbook.pot, string 305