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<personname> <firstname>Allan</firstname> <surname>Jude</surname> </personname> <contrib>bhyve section by </contrib>
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Be familiar with the basics of <link linkend="kernelconfig">kernel configuration and compilation</link>.
Feel comfortable <link linkend="ports">installing software</link> in FreeBSD.
Have some familiarity with <link linkend="disks">disks</link>, storage, and device names in FreeBSD.
<trademark class="registered">Linux</trademark> File Systems
FreeBSD provides built-in support for several <trademark class="registered">Linux</trademark> file systems. This section demonstrates how to load support for and how to mount the supported <trademark class="registered">Linux</trademark> file systems.
<acronym>ext2</acronym>
Kernel support for ext2 file systems has been available since FreeBSD 2.2. In FreeBSD 8.x and earlier, the code is licensed under the <acronym>GPL</acronym>. Since FreeBSD 9.0, the code has been rewritten and is now <acronym>BSD</acronym> licensed.
The <citerefentry><refentrytitle>ext2fs</refentrytitle><manvolnum>5</manvolnum></citerefentry> driver allows the FreeBSD kernel to both read and write to ext2 file systems.
This driver can also be used to access ext3 and ext4 file systems. The <citerefentry><refentrytitle>ext2fs</refentrytitle><manvolnum>5</manvolnum></citerefentry> filesystem has full read and write support for ext4 as of FreeBSD 12.0-RELEASE. Additionally, extended attributes and ACLs are also supported, while journalling and encryption are not. Starting with FreeBSD 12.1-RELEASE, a DTrace provider will be available as well. Prior versions of FreeBSD can access ext4 in read and write mode using <package>sysutils/fusefs-ext2</package>.
To access an ext file system, first load the kernel loadable module:
<prompt>#</prompt> <userinput>kldload ext2fs</userinput>
Then, mount the ext volume by specifying its FreeBSD partition name and an existing mount point. This example mounts <filename>/dev/ad1s1</filename> on <filename>/mnt</filename>:
<prompt>#</prompt> <userinput>mount -t ext2fs <replaceable>/dev/ad1s1</replaceable> <replaceable>/mnt</replaceable></userinput>
Virtualization
<personname> <firstname>Murray</firstname> <surname>Stokely</surname> </personname> <contrib>Contributed by </contrib>
<personname> <firstname>Allan</firstname> <surname>Jude</surname> </personname> <contrib>bhyve section by </contrib>
<personname> <firstname>Benedict</firstname> <surname>Reuschling</surname> </personname> <contrib>Xen section by </contrib>
Virtualization software allows multiple operating systems to run simultaneously on the same computer. Such software systems for <acronym>PC</acronym>s often involve a host operating system which runs the virtualization software and supports any number of guest operating systems.
The difference between a host operating system and a guest operating system.
How to install FreeBSD on an <trademark class="registered">Intel</trademark>-based <trademark class="registered">Apple</trademark> <trademark class="registered">Mac</trademark> computer.
How to install FreeBSD on <trademark class="registered">Microsoft</trademark> <trademark class="registered">Windows</trademark> with <application>Virtual PC</application>.
How to install FreeBSD as a guest in <application>bhyve</application>.
How to tune a FreeBSD system for best performance under virtualization.
Understand the <link linkend="basics">basics of <trademark class="registered">UNIX</trademark> and FreeBSD</link>.
Know how to <link linkend="bsdinstall">install FreeBSD</link>.
Know how to <link linkend="advanced-networking">set up a network connection</link>.
Know how to <link linkend="ports">install additional third-party software</link>.
FreeBSD as a Guest on <application>Parallels</application> for <trademark class="registered">Mac OS</trademark> X
<application>Parallels Desktop</application> for <trademark class="registered">Mac</trademark> is a commercial software product available for <trademark class="registered">Intel</trademark> based <trademark class="registered">Apple</trademark> <trademark class="registered">Mac</trademark> computers running <trademark class="registered">Mac OS</trademark> 10.4.6 or higher. FreeBSD is a fully supported guest operating system. Once <application>Parallels</application> has been installed on <trademark class="registered">Mac OS</trademark> X, the user must configure a virtual machine and then install the desired guest operating system.
Installing FreeBSD on Parallels/<trademark class="registered">Mac OS</trademark> X
The first step in installing FreeBSD on <application>Parallels</application> is to create a new virtual machine for installing FreeBSD. Select <guimenuitem>FreeBSD</guimenuitem> as the <guimenu>Guest OS Type</guimenu> when prompted:

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FreeBSD Doc / books_handbookSpanish

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Source string comment
(itstool) path: authorgroup/author
Source string location
book.translate.xml:41992
String age
a year ago
Source string age
a year ago
Translation file
books/es_ES/handbook.po, string 6796